pyramid

Chichen Itza

Chichen Itza was a large pre-Columbian city built by the Maya civilization. The archaeological site is located in the municipality of Tinum, in the Mexican state of Yucatán. Chichen Itza was one of the largest Maya cities and it was likely to have been one of the mythical great cities, or Tollans, referred to in later Mesoamerican literature. The city may have had the most diverse population in the Maya world, a factor that could have contributed to the variety of architectural styles at the site. Many tourists visit Chichen Itza as a day trip, especially from Cancun, more than 100 miles away. This archaeological site is also an hour and a half away from Merida, the capital of Yucatan. The Maya communities near Chichen Itza have developed many wonderful sites for travelers to rejoice in the Maya Cultural heritage. It is recommended you avoid a day-trip visit to Chichen Itza and schedule a night or two to enjoy all the activities nearby.

The ruins are divided into two groups. One group belongs to the classic Maya Period and was built between the 7th and 10th centuries A.D., at which time the city became a prominent ceremonial center. The other group corresponds to the Maya-Toltec Period, from the later part of the 10th century to the beginning of the 13th century A.D. This area includes the Sacred Well and most of the outstanding ruins. The Maya name: “Chichen Itza” means ” at the edge of the Itza’s well.” This derives from chi’, meaning “mouth” or “edge”, and ch’e'en, meaning “well.” Itzá is the name of an ethnic-lineage group that dominated the northern peninsula of Yucatan, Mexico prior to the Spanish Conquest. It is believed that “Itza” derives from the Maya itz, meaning “magic,” and (h)á, meaning “water;” Itzá means: “Water Magicians.” So experience the magnificent energy of Mayan civilization and visit Chichen Itza.
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Yonaguni Monument, Underwater Ruins in Japan

When someone mentions a pyramid, first thing we think about is a manmade triangle shaped structure with a historical significance. How about a little more challenging destination? Discover Japanese depths and underwater ruins while scuba diving! The Yonaguni Monument is a massive underwater rock formation off the coast of Yonaguni, the southernmost of the Ryukyu Islands, in Japan. There is a debate about whether the site is completely natural, is it a natural site that has been modified, or is it a manmade artifact.

This destination was discovered 1995. by a sport diver. There were whispers of the lost culture of Mu, preserved in legend as the Motherland of Civilization, which perished in the sea long before the beginning of recorded time. But Okinawa’s drowned enigma was hermetically locked within too thick an encrustation. The structure looked anciently manmade. Nature, however, sometimes made her own forms appear artificial. Popular and scientific debate concerning its origins argued back and forth. Then, in late summer of the following year, another diver in Okinawa waters was shocked to see a massive arch or gateway of huge stone blocks beautifully fitted together in the manner of prehistoric masonry found among the Inca cities on the other side of the Pacific Ocean, in the Andes Mountains of South America.

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